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Old 09-07-2010, 10:46 AM   #16
abc12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmdbley'sBro View Post
so i was just talking with a friend. he tells me a truely horrifying tale showing the police state we now live in! he said he was chilling with his wife watching tv around 10pm. theres a loud knock at the door. he answers it to find a uniformed rcmp & a suite (detective) standing there. they have a warrant - its for Downloaded Movies!!!

the cop in a way admits to him what a extortion mafia racket this is by saying 'hey feel lucky you don't own a house & just rent. cause each movie can be (was it, either) $26K fine or $260K fine Per Movie!!' and went on about how one guy had to lose his home & declare bankruptcy, etc

so #1 everything we do online is monitored #2 you thought speeding tickets were bullshit!? just wait. go find every u.s media story you can ($20K fines for 1 song, total legal rape, etc) - cause we're doing that here now too i guess! I recall hardly seeing Any canadian media coverage of this (in general), perhaps its because people will get upset.
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so what happen in the end with your buddy, did they confiscate his computer for investigation and was he fined?

by chance does he run his own server or just downloads off of others.
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:34 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullet Ride View Post
Where does the "notice and notice" program that the ISPs use fall? When they email you saying they know you downloaded Pirates of the Caribbean last week and that you should delete it and inform them when you have done so. There's obviously no legal weight there but they've been doing that for a few years now. Yeah it's not like they are going and telling the Police because like you said that would be illegal. So it's more like technically they are monitoring you, but legally they are not.
This is news to me. Which ISPs have started doing this? I'm with a smaller Bell reseller.
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Old 09-08-2010, 09:15 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Flyview View Post
This is news to me. Which ISPs have started doing this? I'm with a smaller Bell reseller.
The only one I know for sure is Rogers, because that's who my buddy was with when he got the notice. I'm with bell and I've never gotten anything like that.
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Old 09-08-2010, 12:39 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmdbley'sBro View Post
all I found

Quote:
Perhaps even more important, uploaders, and to an extent, downloaders too (certainly those on torrents), will now be liable. While in the past, the RMCP has stated it won’t pursue uploaders, with new laws come changes in policy for those that enforce the laws. Bill C-61 contains a statutory damage amount of $500.

Limitation
(1.If a copyright owner has made an election under subsection (1), a defendant who is an individual is liable for statutory damages of $500 in respect of all the defendant’s infringements that were done for the defendant’s private purposes and that are involved in the proceedings.

This is a change from the previous wording, which gave the court latitude to drop that $500 to as low as $200.

Scene members, and torrent sites will also find themselves under increasing pressure. Despite claims that most torrent sites are not commercial, it’s not stopped industry associations from claiming they are, in order to get law enforcement action against them. From the act,

Circumvention of technological measure
(3.1) Every person, except a person who is acting on behalf of a library, archive or museum or an educational institution, is guilty of an offence who knowingly and for commercial purposes contravenes section 41.1 and is liable

(a) on conviction on indictment, to a fine not exceeding $1,000,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or to both; or

(b) on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding $25,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to both.



http://torrentfreak.com/canada-propo...cy-law-080612/
From your quoted article
for commercial purposes

Meaning Pacific Mall pirates, not you average for personal use pirate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sirex View Post
The invasion of privacy is about monitoring the data that enters and leaves your home. Regardless if the data is "illegal" material, without a warrant, they cannot be monitoring your private communication.
No one is monitoring your internet. All they do is open up a torrent and look at all the clients.
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Old 09-08-2010, 12:47 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmdbley'sBro View Post
so i was just talking with a friend. he tells me a truely horrifying tale showing the police state we now live in! he said he was chilling with his wife watching tv around 10pm. theres a loud knock at the door. he answers it to find a uniformed rcmp & a suite (detective) standing there. they have a warrant - its for Downloaded Movies!!!

the cop in a way admits to him what a extortion mafia racket this is by saying 'hey feel lucky you don't own a house & just rent. cause each movie can be (was it, either) $26K fine or $260K fine Per Movie!!' and went on about how one guy had to lose his home & declare bankruptcy, etc
-
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So I'll preface what I'm about to say by agreeing that the new copyright legislation, and this war on 'piracy' are just nuts.

Basically I just wanted to clarify a couple things, because this doesn't make sense. There's no such thing as a warrant issued for downloading movies. A warrant is issued in order for the police to carry out certain actions, ie. an arrest warrant, a search warrant, a seizure warrant etc. Is it possible he was issued a summons? ie, he's being sued by a record company or something?

The 26k fine or whatever, also doesn't make sense, because I'm not aware of any Canadian laws such as this for downloading movies. The police or government don't fine people for downloading movies, it's a civil matter which would require issuance in a civil court (ie. being sued). I could see him getting sued by a company for copyright infringement for the downloads, and maybe that amount was 26k or 260k?

Quote:
so #1 everything we do online is monitored #2 you thought speeding tickets were bullshit!? just wait. go find every u.s media story you can ($20K fines for 1 song, total legal rape, etc) - cause we're doing that here now too i guess! I recall hardly seeing Any canadian media coverage of this (in general), perhaps its because people will get upset.
On this topic, not everything online is monitored, but everyone has to be aware that everything online resides on private servers scattered all around the world, and when you're on those servers, whatever you do is up for grabs to the people that own them.

If for instance a record company decides to "plant" a movie on one of their servers, and offer it up for grabs over a bit torrent connection, then anyone who connects to it, they could log freely, and proceed however they see fit. On the same token, if someone else is freely allowing others to download movies from them, and a record company connects and sees that it's their movie being distributed, then the information to track that person down is freely available (ie. IP address, ISP etc). So there's no monitoring necessary, the information to do all that is freely available, that's just the nature of the internet.
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Old 09-08-2010, 02:37 PM   #21
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When your downloading torrents, like SickFinga said, it is recorded that you were there, and downloaded file "X".

If the police want to know who was DLing illegally, all they need to do is serve a warrant for info to whichever place you got the torrent from. It's not like they have your phone line tapped, and if they did, they would have a warrant for that too.

I don't understand how a lot of people think that getting caught doing illegal activities is wrong. Whenever you visit a web site, it records that you were there, your IP can be tracked you know. It;s not that hard.

Basically as long as a warrant is served to whoever, for whatever info, it's legal. Then they track everything back to you, and issue a warrant, or whatever to you.

Not illegal.

Oh, anybody have a tinfoil hat i can barrow?
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Old 09-08-2010, 06:08 PM   #22
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use peerguardian to block bad peers.

p2p is garbage altogether. Get yourself ax to a topsite, buy a rapidshare account, use a streaming file site (plug: icefilms.info). Dont upload if you dont know what you're doing.

Realistically, no one gives a ****, but dont try your luck if you're clueless.
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Old 09-08-2010, 11:20 PM   #23
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Old 09-08-2010, 11:57 PM   #24
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Old 09-26-2010, 01:29 PM   #25
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Anyone here have experience with using this: BTGUARD. (www.btguard.com)
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Old 09-26-2010, 01:53 PM   #26
sirex
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ah, they offer the VPN service.

Problem with that is that you have to pay, as well they keep your information on their servers. Seems like they are based out of Toronto too.

So all it takes is their servers being confiscated and everything youve done being shown. As well, you put your privacy in their hands.
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Old 09-26-2010, 07:52 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abc12 View Post

so what happen in the end with your buddy, did they confiscate his computer for investigation and was he fined?

by chance does he run his own server or just downloads off of others.
he said yeah they took it for a few days, then gave it back.


few more things:

OECD,
an international organisation helping governments tackle the economic, social and governance challenges of a globalised ...
http://www.oecd.org/home/0,3305,en_2..._1_1_1,00.html


BayTSP
Monitor for your content online and, when necessary, take action to have it removed. Use business intelligence to know where your content is appearing on UGC sites, P2P networks and Cyberlockers. Learn where your audiences congregate, track your content's "virality" and measure the effectiveness of online campaigns. Movies appear online within days of release, TV shows within minutes. Live and pay-per-view events are streamed illegally. Music, software, and videogames are more widely available for free download. And unauthorized e-books are growing in popularity.
http://www.baytsp.com/


Bill c32
But there is a glaring problem: all these new freedoms are overridden by the government’s total surrender on the matter of “digital rights management,” restrictive types of software that control our use of the e-books, DVDs, or video games we purchase—what devices we may use, who we may share with, and how many times. No one would stand for a shirt that self-destructed unless worn with a certain brand of jeans, but that is the essence of DRM—the things you purchase never belong to you. Under C-32 as currently written, circumventing any digital lock would be a crime, even if the purpose were legal. With this measure, the bill legitimizes the sinister notion that large corporate interests are entitled to broad, intrusive powers to control how individuals consume culture. That idea is dangerous

http://this.org/magazine/2010/09/17/fair-copyright/
http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&biw=1003...e9afdc1c4696ce


-

CRIA Faces $60 Billion Lawsuit
Monday December 07 2009, @07:00PM

"The Canadian Recording Industry Association faces a lawsuit for 60 billion dollars over willful infringement. These numbers may sound outrageous, yet they are based on the same rules that led the recording industry to claim a single file sharer is liable for millions in damages. Since these exact same companies are currently in the middle of trying to force the Canadian government to bring in a DMCA for Canada, it will be interesting to see how they try to spin this."
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/09/12/...wsuit?from=rss

The class action seeks the option of statutory damages for each infringement. At $20,000 per infringement, potential liability exceeds $6 billion
http://www.thestar.com/business/arti...r-infringement


Quote:
Canada don’t need no stinkin’ DMCA

(or DCMA)Title amendment at June 1st, 2010

Michael Geist says that they are planning to call the new “copyright” law
the Digital Copyright Modernization Act or Canadian DCMA
I guess that ways they can say it isn’t a “Canadian DMCA” with a straight face
…. llr

Yesterday morning I was just taking a quick peek at Twitter before getting back to revisions when I saw a tweet from The Electronic Frontier Foundation:

RT@BoingBoing Canadian Prime Minister promises to enact a Canadian DMCA in six weeks http://bit.ly/c8Re4h

That did not sound promising. In fact it sounded downright scary. The Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) is widely known to be a deeply flawed draconian copyright law. And that isn’t just a Canadian perception, that’s an opinion shared by many people around the world. It is reasonable to assume that a good part of the citizen resistance to A.C.T.A. is a direct result of seeing the DMCA in action.

You might wonder why I am so concerned. After all, this is just the announcement of a bill that won’t even be available for First Reading before June. This bill is so new it doesn’t have a number yet. But previous drafts of so called Canadian “copyright reforms” have been bad. And the fact that representatives of this government are involved in the fast tracked secret A.C.T.A. negotiations does not instill confidence.

being heard
It seems that increasingly our elected representatives choose to ignore Canadians. After all, more than eight thousand concerned Canadians made submissions to the copyright consultation. What we said appears not to have been heard by our government.

As a mother, I have a powerful stake in the future. As a creator and a consumer, copyright is also very important to me. But I am only a private citizen. One person. So it takes a lot to make my voice heard.

When my government demonstrates its willingness to ignore not just my voice, but the voices of thousands of my fellow citizens, then I need to do my best to encourage even more citizens to speak up. That means starting now, before the new bill is released to public scrutiny because there must be time to inform many more Canadians of the issue.

In 2007, the architect of the DMCA and the WIPO Internet Treaties admitted:

“…our attempts at copyright control have not been successful…”

—Chairman Bruce Lehman, International Intellectual Property Institute March 24, 2007
boingboing: DMCA’s author says the DMCA is a failure, blames record industry
Like most Canadians, back then I was so busy with my life that I wasn’t paying much attention. I was leaving politics and lawmaking to the professionals. After all, that’s what they’re paid for, right?


It seems that the politicians want Canada to ratify the WIPO treaties. But that can’t happen until we have enacted domestic laws to back them up. This is why first the Liberals, and now the Conservatives, are trying to put through copyright reform.

The thing of it is, according to Howard Knopf Canada has strong copyright Laws, maybe too strong. In many ways stronger than American Copyright Law.

Now, in 2010, the EFF has made this assessment of the DMCA:

The DMCA Chills Free Expression and Scientific Research.
Experience with section 1201 demonstrates that it is being used to stifle free speech and scientific research. The lawsuit against 2600 magazine, threats against Princeton Professor Edward Felten’s team of researchers, and prosecution of Russian programmer Dmitry Sklyarov have chilled the legitimate activities of journalists, publishers, scientists, students, programmers, and members of the public.
The DMCA Jeopardizes Fair Use.
By banning all acts of circumvention, and all technologies and tools that can be used for circumvention, the DMCA grants to copyright owners the power to unilaterally eliminate the public’s fair use rights. Already, the movie industry’s use of encryption on DVDs has curtailed consumers’ ability to make legitimate, personal-use copies of movies they have purchased.
The DMCA Impedes Competition and Innovation.
Rather than focusing on pirates, some have wielded the DMCA to hinder legitimate competitors. For example, the DMCA has been used to block aftermarket competition in laser printer toner cartridges, garage door openers, and computer maintenance services. Similarly, Apple has used the DMCA to tie its iPhone and iPod devices to Apple’s own software and services.
The DMCA Interferes with Computer Intrusion Laws.
Further, the DMCA has been misused as a general-purpose prohibition on computer network access, a task for which it was not designed and to which it is ill-suited. For example, a disgruntled employer used the DMCA against a former contractor for simply connecting to the company’s computer system through a virtual private network (“VPN”).”
— Electronic Frontier Foundation, Unintended Consequences: Twelve Years under the DMCA
Canada has been under heavy pressure from the United States to follow their legislative lead and create our own DMCA.
First, the Liberal Party of Canada gave it a try with Bill C-60. Fortunately for Canada, the Liberal Party had a minority government at the time and a non-confidence vote killed their Bill C-60. I have no doubt that this law would have passed had there been a Liberal majority.

Next, the Conservative Party of Canada put forth their own Bill C-61 in an attempt to create a Canadian DMCA. Canada was again lucky to have a minority government. There was an even greater outcry from the citizenry. Embarrassing articles in ars technica: “Canadian DMCA” brings “balanced” copyright to Canada and boingboing: Canadian DMCA is worse than the American one seem to have been prevalent. I have no doubt that this law would have passed had there been a Conservative majority.

Luckily for us, Bill C-61 was scrapped by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s first premature prorogation. The Conservatives promised to re-introduce Bill C-61 if they were re-elected. But although they were re-elected, it was without the majority they expected.

but we can’t bank on being lucky
With a minority government, the Conservative government took the reasonable path of addressing one of the chief complaints about the previous attempts — lack of meaningful public consultation. The Ministry of Industry mounted a Canada wide Copyright Consultation. They held “Town Hall” meetings across the country. Unfortunately complaints of “stacking” the speakers, incidents of interested parties being prevented from disseminating literature, or citizens being denied access to the “town hall” venues of these “public” meetings were leveled throughout this part of the process.

But this is the 21st Century. They don’t call this the Information Age for nothing. And to their credit, Industry Canada’s web site hosted an online consultation that would accept submissions from any and all Canadians who cared to speak up. As a citizen, I thought this a good use of technology. This is a prime example of just how democracy can be fine tuned to accurately reflect the will of the people in the 21st Century.

Isn’t the point of a democracy the creation of laws that reflect society’s mores?

How better than to assess the wants and needs of Canadian society than by soliciting the input of concerned Canadians?
More than 8,000 Canadians made written copyright consultation submissions answering the handful of questions posed by the Ministry. Michael Geist provided a nice breakdown and this rebuttal of Robert Owen’s analysis is a good too.
[Mixed up links corrected above]

The Canadian government asked for citizen input and they got it. Instead of the few hundred submissions that I gather are a more common response, they received thousands of submissions. Many Canadians assumed that our government might actually consider what we told them. After all, they asked us what we thought.

Was the copyright consultation all smoke and mirrors?


http://whoacanada.wordpress.com/2010...-stinkin-dmca/
Read It!!
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Old 12-04-2010, 09:43 AM   #28
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just a question concerning this issue.

know file transfers are a big issue around the world, but any one use ip blockers, peerblock, etc... to prevent bad people from tracking you down. Don't know much about these, but...

any recommendations of a program to use regarding this. or any feed back as well. thanks
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:24 PM   #29
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Newsgroups with SSL FTW... Torrents are so 2002
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:17 PM   #30
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Newsgroups with SSL FTW... Torrents are so 2002
how do these newsgroups work? what exactly is it? SSL FTW?
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