PDA

View Full Version : High End 5 Piece Energy Veritas Set FS


Hibbing
03-15-2005, 05:29 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/Hibbing/v23.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/Hibbing/v20c.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/Hibbing/vrear.jpg



These need no introduction. Energy Veritas 2.3 Towers retail at $4500. The 2.0C center retails for $1200 and the rears for $1600. All 5 for $3100.

Absolute Sound said of the 2.3:

I've owned and reviewed a number of mid-sized tower loudspeakers, and to my ears, the Veritas 2.3s offer a new level of refinement. Graced with an apparently seamless midrange and treble, they also boast unusual bass definition and accuracy for a speaker of this type and size. The Veritas 2.3 is capable of playing the most demanding and complicated music without flinching—and giving an amazingly lifelike account of the proceedings for its modest size (40.75 inches high).

After having the 2.3s in my system for several months, I was so impressed at their ability to reproduce subtle detail, as well as a huge soundstage, that I awarded them a Golden Ear Equipment Award for 2001 (Issue 133). But I became curious to know more about what makes this speaker so successful in reproducing the timbres and moods in recorded music in all their variety. How did all those complicated operatic crowd scenes spring so vividly to life in my living room?

These loudspeakers shine in any material I have thrown at them. On the smaller end, for example, they sound outstanding in "Take Five," from Dave Brubeck's Greatest Hits [Columbia CK 65417]. First-class transient detail means you can almost feel the drums and cymbals, and the electricity of the performance. The stable soundstage provides a backdrop for the muted interplay between piano and drums, and the alto sax actually sounds like it is not just centered between but actually slightly in front of the speakers. It's an extraordinary effect.

I also enjoyed an old Vanguard recording, Mozart's 4 Quartets for Flute and Strings [Vanguard CD SVC-115]. The flute is beautifully rendered here, and the success of the 550Hz/2kHz crossover design is apparent by its complete invisibility. The low distortion allows the marvellous, richly detailed portrait of each instrument heard here. The second movement, consisting only of two plucked strings and the flute, illustrates the outstandingly stable placement and exemplary spaciousness (in width, depth and height) the 2.3s will recreate if they are there on the original recording.

My most impressive listening experience with the 2.3s involved the toughest challenge of all—the opening of Puccini's Turandot from the Mehta recording [London OSA 13108]. This is a remarkable recording, whose first scene creates an incredibly complicated sound picture involving a distant chorus, full orchestra and three soloists in an intimate downstage grouping. The 2.3s impress by delivering this huge picture in considerable detail, and with jaw-dropping transparency. The downstage group, here sung by Pavarotti, Montserrat Caballé, and Nicolai Ghiaurov, demonstrate the ability of the 2.3s to achieve beautiful, seamless vocal reproduction throughout the range of the human voice. This is an unexpected meeting between a father (Ghiaurov) and his long-lost son (Pavarotti). The poignancy in the original recording is clearly conveyed here. Once again, the singers are so far downstage that, like the sax in "Take Five," they almost sound as if they are in front of the speakers. The chorus, by contrast, is remarkably far away, though you can still hear a surprising amount of the individual vocal timbres. The louder orchestral passages sound splendid—percussion instruments, especially woodblocks and drums, are remarkable, as are the brass and woodwinds. Sudden fortissimi remain stable, with no detectable break-up of image or sound quality. Excellent bass definition leads to a remarkable level of orchestral "authority" or foundation, and I think this is largely attributable to the use of two woofers in this design.

I continue to be impressed by the incredibly musical product served up by this innovative loudspeaker. The pure infectious joy of "Take Five," and the heart-wrenching human drama that unfolds in the first scene of Turandot are powerfully conveyed in these recorded performances, and their flavor is not lost when you listen through the Veritas 2.3s.

Home Cinema a UK Mag said this about the center:

That innovative approach to design is clearly in evidence here. The bass drivers have a unique faceted surface, which is designed to counter resonances as they travel through the cone, and a dual in-line voice coil in an unusual distortion cancelling configuration. A bolt screwed into the rear of the magnet is coupled to the rear panel, which provides a secure mechanical earth for the cone, but the unit is partly decoupled from the front baffle, reducing the most damaging source of secondary radiation.

There are other highlights here, but the important thing is not what it is, but what it does. The short version is that the V2.0C is an absolute revelation - and regular HCC readers will know that I don't use such words lightly. The Veritas sound is remarkable in two ways. It is unusually even and neutral, and virtually free of all the colourations that add boxiness and obscure detail in most speakers. It is also an incredibly detailed speaker, with an almost electrostatic clarity and speed. Notes start and stop on a pin, male voices lack chestiness and female vocals are given an organic quality that allows passion and expressive range to come thorough without artifice or aggression. The frequency extremes are almost as impressive, the bass especially being deep, full and believable. Probably the only thing against this speaker, price apart, is that it is so good that it is likely to highlight the failings of the rest of the system. Veritas is not exactly a drop-in replacement in the manner of the other speakers tested here. It will make you want to buy matching main speakers too.

And about the rears:


This is a dedicated rear effects speaker, so out go those box shapes that stick out in your listening room like rabbits' ears, in favour of smooth curves and a wall hugging shape that won't intrude. That said, I must admit that the speakers' colouring is too bold to vanish into the wallpaper. Uniquely, the V2.0R comes with double-sided side panels: one side is finished in black gloss, and the other in cherry.

Out go the familiar direct radiating speaker arrays too. The Veritas features a complex array of mid and bass units, facing towards the front and back of the room, and a single tweeter between them. This should prevent the phase problems that afflict most surround speakers with two laterally displaced tweeters. It also features what the manufacturer grandly describes as their Soundfield Management System (SMS), which allows the speaker to be tuned to the room position and listening angle, or just personal taste.

In its essentials, the voicing of the V2.0R is very similar to the V2.0C, but there are a few differences. The smaller enclosure means less bass, of course, but the box is shallower as well, and it was noticeable that there was more energy radiating off the back of the enclosure than was the case with the V2.0C model. Nevertheless, this is a clean and detailed speaker, especially around the midband, and when properly integrated with the rest of the system it was capable of unusually explicit directional effects, powerful special effects and music reproduction. When necessary, this is a big sounding speaker, but above all it is an unusually refined one. The V2.0R can be placed successfully almost anywhere in the room, from just in front of the listening plane, to level, behind, on the rear wall, even in corners. SMS allows the sound to be tuned to suit, and to provide bipolar or dipolar radiation, appropriate for Dolby Surround/Pro-Logic or digital surround systems respectively.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/Hibbing/v23.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/Hibbing/v20c.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/Hibbing/vrear.jpg

mogie
03-16-2005, 11:54 AM
May I ask you what are you replacing these with?

Hibbing
03-16-2005, 12:13 PM
I'm not sure. Not really sure I CAN better these ones.

kontesto
03-17-2005, 08:05 PM
You are pricing these higher than the Mirage OMNIs you had for sale?

KM

Hibbing
03-17-2005, 08:09 PM
These retail for 4 times the price of the Omnis.

Hibbing
03-28-2005, 03:39 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
04-01-2005, 12:42 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
04-03-2005, 05:47 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
04-05-2005, 09:30 AM
Bump.

Hibbing
04-15-2005, 01:33 PM
Bump.

kontesto
04-15-2005, 01:47 PM
What color are they?

KM

Hibbing
04-15-2005, 01:49 PM
Piano high gloss black.

Hibbing
04-19-2005, 08:35 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
04-29-2005, 09:03 AM
Bump.

Hibbing
05-05-2005, 03:24 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
05-16-2005, 11:31 AM
Bump.

Hibbing
05-18-2005, 09:38 PM
Reduced to $2900.

Hibbing
05-28-2005, 10:37 AM
Bump.

Deep 3.2TL
05-28-2005, 04:46 PM
New or used?

Deep

Hibbing
06-03-2005, 03:12 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
06-18-2005, 10:47 AM
Bump.

kontesto
07-02-2005, 08:34 PM
New or Used? Do you have a picture of the high gloss black?

KM

Hibbing
07-04-2005, 09:44 AM
They're about a year old. MINT condition like all my gear!

Hibbing
07-10-2005, 09:02 AM
Bump.

Hibbing
07-25-2005, 11:35 AM
Offers considered.

Hibbing
08-09-2005, 02:37 PM
Bump.

Hibbing
08-16-2005, 11:19 AM
Bump.

kontesto
10-22-2005, 02:12 PM
STILL available?

KM

Hibbing
10-23-2005, 07:00 PM
Nope sold. Have a full Mirage setup. OM6,OMC2 and OMR2 FS.

kontesto
10-23-2005, 07:24 PM
Ooooh interested. how much?

KM