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Autotechnica
03-31-2003, 09:49 PM
I just ordered a set of stainless steel braided brake lines from BMP (Earl's), my buddy says they are a snap to install and all I need is a jack and some house hold tools. Since I have limited knowledge when it comes to my braking system I was wondering if anyone knew of a website that could help, or if you could post what do to on here I would appreicate it a lot. Thanks!

Bry

Gamite
04-01-2003, 04:39 AM
Dont you have to bleed the system?


(psst, brake fluid gives you cancer... jp.. but it DID kill charlie's grass)

GR8 Ride
04-01-2003, 01:26 PM
Bryan,


Brake lines are fairly simple, especially in the front. You might want to have a spare rubber plug or two to avoid losing too much brake fluid.

Outside of a decent set of metric wrenches, you don't really need much to change brake lines (except a buddy, to help you bleed the brakes afterward). Oh, and some spare brake fluid.


Pat

Autotechnica
04-01-2003, 02:24 PM
Originally posted by GR8 Ride
Bryan,


Brake lines are fairly simple, especially in the front. You might want to have a spare rubber plug or two to avoid losing too much brake fluid.

Outside of a decent set of metric wrenches, you don't really need much to change brake lines (except a buddy, to help you bleed the brakes afterward). Oh, and some spare brake fluid.


Pat

Pat,

The problem is, I actually don't know where to begin. When I removed my wheels and Charlie helped me install my Bilstein struts I remember the brake lines were tied onto a clip which was attached to my struts. Do I have to disconnect the brake lines from somewhere in the engine bay? Also, will I need to re-adjust certain things after the install? I've looked for the brake vaccum pump in my engine bay and the problem could be that I have no clue what it looks like.

I was thinking of replacing my old brake fluid w/ ATE superblue, is this any good?

Thanks,

Bryan

Autotechnica
04-01-2003, 02:30 PM
Originally posted by Gamite
Dont you have to bleed the system?


(psst, brake fluid gives you cancer... jp.. but it DID kill charlie's grass)

I bought some brake fluid from crappy tire a long time ago because I needed to top it off. I got some on my skin and freaked out! There was this huge warning label on it that told you not to get it on your skin because it causes cancer.

Maybe I'll let Charlie do it, since he most likely already has cancer.. haha j/k

Bry

NickP
04-01-2003, 02:43 PM
If you have a bottle of brake fluid that's been open for more than a couple of weeks throw it out... its hydroscopic.

I would also recommend buying a line wrench if you're doing it yourself... its an open end wrench that wraps around all corners of the bolt and avoids rounding them off.

The process is basically unscrew / unbolt the old line, put in the new one without any twists and bleeding the brakes. You also have to make sure the line doesn't bind or rub against anything.

That's about it.

KIRASIR
04-01-2003, 02:44 PM
Bryan,

Jack up the car, take one of the front wheels off, and take a look.

The brake lines all over the car are actually metal, except the parts that connect to the wheels(they gotta bend, right? :) ), so they are rubber. This is what you need to replace.

One side of the rubber line is connected directily to the caliper, the other one to the metal line on the side of the wheel well. Take UW-40 and spray the hell out of those connections, otherwise you risk breaking off the metal fitting on the metal line.(guess what that means? Right, a major PITA. :D)

So spray all 4 connections. You may also spray the caliper side as well(they are usually bolts). Since you car is a 92(?), I would take extra care when disconnecting the rubber lines from the metal ones, so use a lot of penetrating oil and really let it sink in.

Once you remove the rubber pieces, try to plug the metal fittings with something; prepare for a lot of brake fluid on the groud. Get some kind of a pan to catch the fluid. It's gonna be messy. Keep the cap on the brake cylinder on, it will help somewhat, since fluid won't go out as fast, and you will have more time to plug the lines.

Connect the new pieces, take care not to overtighten the bolts/nuts.

Repeat for other 3 wheels.

Bleed the brakes. You are actually supposed start bleeding with the one of the rear sides first then work your way to the front. (I cannot remember the proper order, someone is welcome to chip in, or look up Bentley's manual.)

And did I say that this is a messy job? :D

It also makes sense to change the brake fluid completely.

Sorry if the English is a bit too colloquial.

Serge

PS Personally I think you should've spent your money on something better than stainless steel braided lines but that's just my opinion.

GR8 Ride
04-01-2003, 05:30 PM
Bryan,

It's a fairly simple process. There is only one line to replace for each front caliper, and two lines per side in the rear. All the other lines in the car are tubular, and not generally replaceable.

With a bit of preparation, it's about an hour job to do.

As to ATE Super Blue, there isn't anything wrong with it. A lot of what is read / typed / spouted about brake fluid is more marketing than chemistry. All decent brake fluids are hygroscopic (not hydroscopic...the word doesn't exist, though it would appear to roll off the tongue easier than hygroscopic).

All poly-ethylene glycol based brake fluids (everything except DOT 5) absorb water at some rate. The wet boiling point for each of these brake fluids is measured at 3% by volume, which is the maximum amount of water the fluid can absorb anyway. Dry boiling point is measured in it's purest form, but brake fluid starts absorbing water from the atmosphere as soon as the bottle is opened anyway.

That being said, it's something that should be changed every 2 years or so.

I don't mind giving you a hand with it sometime, but I'm not sure how much of a rush you are in to replace the lines. This weekend it's supposed to be 0 C outside (damn..!!) and next weekend I'm at Mosport.

Oh, and there's nothing wrong with upgrading to stainless steel brake lines on a car; it's one of the 'no-brainer' upgrades we usually recommend to people. Like stock rubber lines though, they do need to be checked on a regular basis, and replaced occasionally.


Pat

Autotechnica
04-02-2003, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by GR8 Ride
Bryan,

It's a fairly simple process. There is only one line to replace for each front caliper, and two lines per side in the rear. All the other lines in the car are tubular, and not generally replaceable.

With a bit of preparation, it's about an hour job to do.

As to ATE Super Blue, there isn't anything wrong with it. A lot of what is read / typed / spouted about brake fluid is more marketing than chemistry. All decent brake fluids are hygroscopic (not hydroscopic...the word doesn't exist, though it would appear to roll off the tongue easier than hygroscopic).

All poly-ethylene glycol based brake fluids (everything except DOT 5) absorb water at some rate. The wet boiling point for each of these brake fluids is measured at 3% by volume, which is the maximum amount of water the fluid can absorb anyway. Dry boiling point is measured in it's purest form, but brake fluid starts absorbing water from the atmosphere as soon as the bottle is opened anyway.

That being said, it's something that should be changed every 2 years or so.

I don't mind giving you a hand with it sometime, but I'm not sure how much of a rush you are in to replace the lines. This weekend it's supposed to be 0 C outside (damn..!!) and next weekend I'm at Mosport.

Oh, and there's nothing wrong with upgrading to stainless steel brake lines on a car; it's one of the 'no-brainer' upgrades we usually recommend to people. Like stock rubber lines though, they do need to be checked on a regular basis, and replaced occasionally.


Pat

Hey Pat,

Thanks for the offer I really appreciate it. I'm not really in any rush to install them as I just ordered them a few days ago. I should be getting them some time next week I believe. Hopefully it will warm up by then.

Bry

Shamis
04-04-2003, 12:29 PM
I have a manual that shows you how to do that if you want to borrow it.

All I ask in return is to show me how to fix fiberglass......

Autotechnica
04-04-2003, 03:39 PM
Originally posted by Shamis
I have a manual that shows you how to do that if you want to borrow it.

All I ask in return is to show me how to fix fiberglass......

Shamis,

Like I said before, I don't mind helping you out w/ the fibreglass. But you have to realize that the weater hasn't been the greatest lately. -5 to +2 degrees? You have to have at least 20-25 degrees for the fibreglass to bond and dry properly. And trust me, you don't want to do this indoors, it smells like ass and you'll get all dizzy from the fumes. It's also very very messy, make sure you get some latex gloves.

I'll help you out when the weather gets better. I have a wing that needs to be refinished as well and I'm waiting for it to warm up.

Bryan