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rokka
01-11-2009, 07:43 PM
I've found a car, 528 2.8L, everything seems more or less ok, except some noise in front suspension (probably it were stabiliser bars, don't know exactly how they are called). And there is some oil on the right side of the engine. Almost all of 5xx that I've seen have some oil on the engine. Unfortunately, there are no perfect cars in my budget range.

So, I need a mechanic in Oakwille to check everything. The guy who is selling the car works in a local bmw dealership, so the car can be checked at official dealrship... But it will be not completely independent inspection.
If anybody know mechanic in Oakwille (or somewhere nearby, even in Mississauga ) to make "before buying inspection", please recommend!

Thanks,
Roman

Duskywing
01-11-2009, 11:06 PM
I've found a car, 528 2.8L, everything seems more or less ok, except some noise in front suspension (probably it were stabiliser bars, don't know exactly how they are called). And there is some oil on the right side of the engine. Almost all of 5xx that I've seen have some oil on the engine. Unfortunately, there are no perfect cars in my budget range.

So, I need a mechanic in Oakwille to check everything. The guy who is selling the car works in a local bmw dealership, so the car can be checked at official dealrship... But it will be not completely independent inspection.
If anybody know mechanic in Oakwille (or somewhere nearby, even in Mississauga ) to make "before buying inspection", please recommend!

Thanks,
Roman

Check Cross Avenue Auto, you can ask even ask the seller to have it safetied and etested there.

rodo
01-11-2009, 11:08 PM
call Sam at Cross Ave. Auto

rokka
01-11-2009, 11:09 PM
call Sam at Cross Ave. Auto

Thanks!

rokka
01-11-2009, 11:11 PM
Check Cross Avenue Auto, you can ask even ask the seller to have it safetied and etested there.
Thanks!
The seller said e-test and safety is not a problem...

Duskywing
01-12-2009, 12:17 AM
Thanks!
The seller said e-test and safety is not a problem...

Yes, but you still need it for registration purposes.

rokka
01-12-2009, 12:19 AM
Yes, but you still need it for registration purposes.

What does the whole process look like?
He-he, this will be my first car in ON :)

King Luis
01-12-2009, 09:37 AM
OakVille.

dtthiaga
01-12-2009, 11:07 AM
I would do the following, in the order I suggest.

A) Call your insurance company. Make sure you can afford the insurance.
Don't buy a car without doing this first!!!!

B) Drive the car thoroughly. Highway, City. Pull into driveways (normally) to check for any rattles in the front end etc. Drive over railway tracks at normal speeds and listen for weird noises if any. If the car is not insured, I usually don’t bother. Most insurance companies offer 30days dual coverage for free. Watch for guys trying to flip cars.

C) Do a cold start. Ask the seller, that you would like to come back and start the car after it has sat over night. Before starting, make sure the engine is completely cold. Open the hood and check the rad hose, top of engine. Start the car, and make sure the temp is cold. This will give you an good indication on how the car will perform for you.

D) Ask the following questions.
- How long have you had it. Ideally, should be > 1 Year.
- Have there been any accidents you know of?
- Has anything being repainted?
- Do you have Service Records?

E) Always negotiate that the care is sold certified and e-tested. That is, the seller will get the certification done (within 30 days), and a recent e-test is done. Although it is valid for 1 year, I would never except anything over 1 month old etest. O2 Censors, Cats etc could go, and you don't want that mess.

F) After all of this, and you like the car, put a conditional offer, subject to mechanic's approval. If the seller rejects, walk way. Make sure you bill of sale indicates deposit is refundable if the mechanic finds problems that is not already disclosed.

G) After you buy the car, I would get a safety done again. A lot of shops cut corners or miss things. If another mechanic finds something wrong in terms of safety, they guy who issued it must fix it for free. It's worth the time and money.

H) Change air filter, oil change, think about changing spark plugs.

I) Enjoy your new car. :)
Aasdfasd

Quack
01-12-2009, 11:09 AM
if has front end suspension noises & it passes safety? you better check that front end noise to be sure it's not safety related.

damameke
01-12-2009, 12:47 PM
Safety inspection in Ontario is a joke...with balding tire(to a certain depth),, it will still pass inspection.

Use your own mechanic to inspect the major components.

dtthiaga
01-12-2009, 01:31 PM
^ No, it needs to be 2/32's depth. No exceptions.
Some mechanics pass it.. some won't.

4/32 is what most people recommend. That is why it's always good to get a second safety by your own mechanic. Worth the extra $50.00.

328i Cab
01-12-2009, 03:37 PM
I would do the following, in the order I suggest.



G) After you buy the car, I would get a safety done again. A lot of shops cut corners or miss things. If another mechanic finds something wrong in terms of safety, they guy who issued it must fix it for free. It's worth the time and money.


Aasdfasd

I may be mistaken but I don't believe the guy who issues the safety must fix any undisclosed damage for free. In theory, something could be damaged after the inspection, it even says on the safety certificate that it does not warrant the condition of the vehicle or something, that it is just supposed to be an inspection at a specific time.

It is a good idea to get another independent check done to make sure the car is 100% but I think you would have a very hard time getting a mechanic to fix things for free. Some items are also a 'judgment' item and some mechanics do try to pad bills by making you do things that don't really need to be done (not pointing fingers at all, it does happen tho).

Cross Avenue is great, never dealt with them personally but everyone I talk to says they're top notch and there are always tons of BMWs parked out front 'in line'.

dtthiaga
01-12-2009, 05:58 PM
I may be mistaken but I don't believe the guy who issues the safety must fix any undisclosed damage for free. In theory, something could be damaged after the inspection, it even says on the safety certificate that it does not warrant the condition of the vehicle or something, that it is just supposed to be an inspection at a specific time.

It is a good idea to get another independent check done to make sure the car is 100% but I think you would have a very hard time getting a mechanic to fix things for free. Some items are also a 'judgment' item and some mechanics do try to pad bills by making you do things that don't really need to be done (not pointing fingers at all, it does happen tho).

Cross Avenue is great, never dealt with them personally but everyone I talk to says they're top notch and there are always tons of BMWs parked out front 'in line'.

Actually, if a car "Passes" Safety, it should pass "Safety" at another shop.

If there is an issue, especially right after the first safety, the shop will loose it's license for giving a false safety. It has to be fixed.

All you have to do is report it to the ministry, that Shop X issued a safety, when it should not have.

For example, if one of the ball joints are gone, which is a safety item, and Shop X issues a safety certificate.

Shop Y does a check the next day or two and finds the faulty ball joint, Shop X could be in trouble for it for writing the safety certificate. If you call Shop X up, they will fix it; they should. Just mention, “You issued a fake safety, I’m calling the Ministry”.

I’ve had to do this a couple of times.

My mechanics are very strict when it comes to this. It has to pass legitimately.

328i Cab
01-12-2009, 10:14 PM
Actually, if a car "Passes" Safety, it should pass "Safety" at another shop.

If there is an issue, especially right after the first safety, the shop will loose it's license for giving a false safety. It has to be fixed.

All you have to do is report it to the ministry, that Shop X issued a safety, when it should not have.

For example, if one of the ball joints are gone, which is a safety item, and Shop X issues a safety certificate.

Shop Y does a check the next day or two and finds the faulty ball joint, Shop X could be in trouble for it for writing the safety certificate. If you call Shop X up, they will fix it; they should. Just mention, “You issued a fake safety, I’m calling the Ministry”.

I’ve had to do this a couple of times.

My mechanics are very strict when it comes to this. It has to pass legitimately.


I fully agree with you, you can whistleblow on a shop that writes a fraudulent safety but you can't get them to 'fix stuff for free' (or i would be VERY surprised for a shop to do that).

Junaid
01-14-2009, 08:38 PM
Yah take it to Sam at Cross, great guy.

europrince
01-15-2009, 04:37 PM
I've found a car, 528 2.8L, everything seems more or less ok, except some noise in front suspension (probably it were stabiliser bars, don't know exactly how they are called). And there is some oil on the right side of the engine. Almost all of 5xx that I've seen have some oil on the engine. Unfortunately, there are no perfect cars in my budget range.

So, I need a mechanic in Oakwille to check everything. The guy who is selling the car works in a local bmw dealership, so the car can be checked at official dealrship... But it will be not completely independent inspection.
If anybody know mechanic in Oakwille (or somewhere nearby, even in Mississauga ) to make "before buying inspection", please recommend!

Thanks,
Roman


If you can't afford a car in better shape in your budget range, why are you looking at a 5 series. You need good cash flow to keep up with the maintenance. If you can't afford it, don't buy it.

Suspension work? Oil leaks? And you want to buy it???

5thseries
01-15-2009, 04:45 PM
Buy my Taurus. =)

TNation
01-15-2009, 08:41 PM
hey buddy here's what I do before a car, a detailed list. Take it from me, I appraised cars.

Examing a Car

I thought I'd type out what may help prospective buyers when looking for a vehicle.
Take it from me, I've been burnt $4k on an e36 BMW and $2800 on a 97 Infiniti QX4, which isn't much, but its a solid learning lesson. Ever since learning to appraise vehicles, I've developed a systematic way to inspect vehicles. First of all, I do proven research beforehand. I talk to the seller before I look at it, and let him answer my first basic question..
"Do you have maintainence receipts for this car?" and "where has this car been maintained all its life?" If he stutters, falters, doesn't know what to say, I'm not interested. I want a car that's been well maintained and has receipts to back this up. In the under 5k mark, its much harder to find, and often I'll just look at the car if the guy has knowledge of the car and what has been changed lately, even if he doesn't have "receipts." Receipts are your best friend, always try to find a car with receipts.

When I go to see the car, I notice the type of person he is. Older, 40's to 60's he probably hasn't bagged on the car (yes its a stereotype, but its damn true). If he's younger, 18 to 25, he's bagged the crap out of the car, very likely (I saw too many Tiburons and GSR's and Civics just in rough rough shape due to bagging). Just keep this in mind.
First and foremost, I examine the body of the car thoroughly.

- Rust is very important to me. For under $5k vehicles in Ontario you're probably going to find some. But rust is a good indicator of whether it was winter driven, how it was maintained, and what the car's condition will be in the future (i.e. a rust bucket). I always buy rust-free vehicles personally, I HATE rust.
- Dents/scratches. I expect a few if its city driven, but if I see a fair bit on a 'high mileage highway driven only' car, its an alert to me, that it was city driven lots. Like I said, the body is crucial to me, I can always fix an engine, or fix mechanical parts, but if your body doesn't look good, than your car will never have the same type of resale. I.e., a really rusty E36 BMW M3.

I get in the car and look at the interior next:
- Is it worn, abused, is it clean? When I was appraising vehicles I noticed that about 90% of the cars that had well worn interiors and unclean dashboards and wrecked carpets and were generally filthy were VERY unmaintained mechanically. The owners treat the interior like they treated the maintainence of the car, terribly. I saw a 2002 Corolla with a trashed interior once, and the car was on its last legs. It only had 140xxxkm on it. He hadn't done an oil change in 20 to 25 thousand km.. he didn't see the 'point in it.' So, I often stay away from cars that are disgusting inside. And surprisingly enough, you still see lots of cars that are dirty inside.
- I try every mechanical and electronic function from wipers to horn to climate control to A/C to heat at full and low blast, from headlights to high beams to seat warmers to radio to rear wiper to alarm to keyless remote to hazards... everything. Expect one thing not too work..its normal.
- I pop the trunk, take a look at the engine bay. Is it clean or is it dirty? A clean engine bay means the owner probably took it to the carwash before he showed it to you, so don't think its just 'clean' that its been well maintained. I always check:
0- Oil and levels and oil color
0- powersteering fluid
0- all fluids, from rad to even windshield fluid.
0- see if belts aren't frayed, if you're allowed check T-Belt if its a non interference engine (i was allowed when I bought my last Lude).

- Than turn on the car and listen to the engine, rev it up and down with throttle cable.. listen for ticking, hammering, anything unusual.
- I examine the lines of the body versus the fenders and the sides of the fender coming into the engine bay to see if its been in an accident, it takes a little bit of practice to see a vehicle with accident history if its been repaired properly. I check the pillars and how they match up, than walk around to the back and look at the rear bumper to see if its sitting high or low. Than I go home and CARPROOF the vehicle (don't carfax it unless its an American car [Carfax misses a lot of stuff]).

Than get in and testdrive. I personally testdrive cars I'm interested a lot different than most people, so I won't write it all here, but I can tell by the way a car drives, what sounds are what parts that have to be replaced. THUNK THUNK = struts, loud road noise and humming from the front often = wheel bearings, etc.
Than get the seller to have it looked at by a mechanic who will doublecheck everything you just did. Have the seller guarantee the e-test in writing and if you want, have him certify it (this doesn't matter to me as much if your mechanic and you check it out and both of you are happy).

Conclusion: You will never find a car that's perfect. Except for my car hehe. But seriously, something will be off, or something won't be 100% right. That's normal. If a brake squeals or rubs, but the rest of the car runs fine and drives like a million bucks and you've ruled out its not a hub or an axle but a squeaky pad, buy it. Used cars are used because they're not perfect. For your money, expect something that will run good, will have a good body (to the best you can afford), and will hopefully not need thousands of maintainence in the near future (unless you're getting a crazy good deal). Make sure, make sure the Used Vehicle Information package lines up with the carproof when you go to buy, and the history is COMPLETELY counted for. You don't want any surprises when you go to buy it!
That's all!