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ericdalinda
03-05-2008, 10:36 PM
**NOOB question**
wondering if anybody can help me with this one. particularly E46 guys.

me and my friend were debating this.

driving around for half hour or so especially on ice cold days the car gets nicely warmed up (can tell by the gauge *wave*) turn it off for well over an hour and a half get back in fire it up and the gauge will read a loss of warmth of around 25%. but on other cars theres has gotten ice cold and need a while to warm up.

But leave it over night and the gauge will read like its supposed to..Ice cold.

now my question is this. is there a built in block heater? Or does the engine recognize its cold outside and out of courtesy trys to stay as warm as possible knowing that the driver will come back and turn it on again very shortly. or is there something just wrong with the gauge????

thanx *wave*

BlitzSix
03-05-2008, 10:40 PM
It happens on higher end cars. Benzes do it too. Vs my Civic which gets ice cold in 30 mins. Not exactly sure why.

ericdalinda
03-05-2008, 10:43 PM
It happens on higher end cars. Benzes do it too. Vs my Civic which gets ice cold in 30 mins. Not exactly sure why.

Soo is this due to a built in block heater? or does all the fluids just stop getting circulated????

Michel
03-05-2008, 10:50 PM
It happens on higher end cars. Benzes do it too. Vs my Civic which gets ice cold in 30 mins. Not exactly sure why.

probably due to the fact that civics have pop can sized engines, therefore don't retain heat as much as a bigger engine. My integra also cools off quick.

Quack
03-05-2008, 10:55 PM
Soo is this due to a built in block heater? or does all the fluids just stop getting circulated????



block heaters have to be plugged in to an electrical outlet

BlitzSix
03-05-2008, 10:55 PM
I doubt it's a block heater. And it doesn't do it in only cold weather. It always does it, because of the way it's made, not becaus it knows it's cold.

My guess is a) the engine bay is WAY more "stuffed" so it keeps heat in vs the civic which is basically empty and b) the material the block is made from is different, maybe more heavy duty so it can keep heat in longer..

Someone who actually knows what they're tlakign about will chime in I'm sure :)

///Milan
03-05-2008, 11:47 PM
It's because a larger engine retains heat better. A V12 will stay warm for a looong time where a little 4 cylinder will cool off rapidly. It's not a courtesy feature and it doesn't matter what brand.

Gamite
03-05-2008, 11:49 PM
It also depends on the type of material. My E34 with it's cast iron block will retain heat for hours after it's shut off. The X5 with it's aluminum block loses it's heat after about an hour.

bimmerjoe
03-05-2008, 11:50 PM
the car has a million liters off coolent so it stays warmer for longer and the engine is big and keep all that coolent warm

AceOfSpades
03-06-2008, 12:10 AM
civic engines are sooo small that they get ice cold withing 2 min. larger engines will take longer time to cool down

Mystikal
03-06-2008, 02:11 PM
It's not just engine size, my 3.0L M3 cools down WAY faster than the similar 2.5L in my moms E46. I never knew the technical reason, figured they just store heat better in the block...somehow.

Jay

someguy
03-06-2008, 02:51 PM
its very dependent on the way the cooling system is made...our cars have relatively more coolant in them than similarly sized engines (at least for the M50) and once the engine shuts down, the hot fluid stays in place, retaining heat. The engine block is also much denser, and of course material matters as aluminum will not have a thermal capacity the same as iron, or even a different alloy of aluminum. I know that bmw engines also have tighter tolerances and that our engines are designed to run at a very specific temperature and the alloy used most likely retains heat to allow the engine to hold that temperature. There are also many other factors, such as insulation of the surrounding walls, how cramped the engine bay is, etc.

ericdalinda
03-06-2008, 03:06 PM
its very dependent on the way the cooling system is made...our cars have relatively more coolant in them than similarly sized engines (at least for the M50) and once the engine shuts down, the hot fluid stays in place, retaining heat. The engine block is also much denser, and of course material matters as aluminum will not have a thermal capacity the same as iron, or even a different alloy of aluminum. I know that bmw engines also have tighter tolerances and that our engines are designed to run at a very specific temperature and the alloy used most likely retains heat to allow the engine to hold that temperature. There are also many other factors, such as insulation of the surrounding walls, how cramped the engine bay is, etc.


thats what i thought it would be, all the liquids will just stay in place to retain the heat.
thanks guys

propr'one
03-07-2008, 12:53 AM
your heat got....

:puke::puke:MERKED:puke::puke:

bimmerjoe
03-07-2008, 12:59 AM
meeeeeeerked

Dr. Flyview
03-07-2008, 11:07 AM
I think the insulation on the underside of the hood also helps, that's why I'm not taking mine off again...