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View Full Version : Buying E30 in states?


e30blue
01-15-2008, 04:13 PM
I'm currently looking to buy another e30 but this time i was looking at some in the states...they run at much lower prices and seem to be in much better shape than the ones found around here...so i was wondering if anybody knew what i would need to get the car across the border and registered...i heard stories where some people had to re-enforce their bumpers and other stuff...does anybody know what kind of money i would be looking to spend in fees, and any safety issues that i'd have to deal with...

maxima_'90
01-15-2008, 08:27 PM
If it's over 15 years old, which, it would be, then nothing. You don't even need the $500 recall letter or the $300 admissibility letter from BMW. Just show up at the border, pay your taxes and you're on your way.

Chris

P.S. - Don't lie about the price or we'll seize your car.

e30blue
01-15-2008, 09:58 PM
So i don't have to worry about meeting safety regulations or anything like that? So overall do you think it's worth it makin the trip south?

maxima_'90
01-15-2008, 10:05 PM
It's going to enter Canada under the 15 year rule, like Skylines do from Japan, so as far as admissibility goes you're in the clear. All you have to be able to do is pass a safety, like any other vehicle, so it can be registered. Take a look at riv.ca for more info.

As far as if it's worth it or not, depends what you find I guess.

MGYVER
01-16-2008, 09:31 AM
Actually you can't "just show up at the border". You need to fax the title for the car to the US customs office at the border point you're crossing at at LEAST 72 hours ahead of time.
When you export the car, you need to stop at that office on the US side - they will give you a form to show the car is being exported. You drive across the border and stop at the Canadian Customs office. They will charge you GST plus $100 air conditioning tax if applicable. You will pay the PST when you register the car in Ontario (you will need a safety and e-test). There is no duty or fees for any car over 15 years old.

Hope that helps.

Arash
01-16-2008, 02:11 PM
Actually you can't "just show up at the border". You need to fax the title for the car to the US customs office at the border point you're crossing at at LEAST 72 hours ahead of time.
When you export the car, you need to stop at that office on the US side - they will give you a form to show the car is being exported. You drive across the border and stop at the Canadian Customs office. They will charge you GST plus $100 air conditioning tax if applicable. You will pay the PST when you register the car in Ontario (you will need a safety and e-test). There is no duty or fees for any car over 15 years old.

Hope that helps.

So you have to pay 2 taxes? I heard its only one tax if you don't buy from dealer.

MGYVER
01-16-2008, 02:36 PM
You have to pay GST and PST on anything that you buy in the States and declare as you bring it into Canada. (emphasis on the DECLARE )

eg. If you buy car parts from the US for your new E30 and have them shipped to Canada, Canada Customs will charge you GST and PST on the declared value. If you buy something on Ebay you STILL will get charged GST and PST on the DECLARED value (items valued under $60 they usually don't bother).

MGYVER
01-16-2008, 02:37 PM
ARASH - I think you are confusing this with buying a used car in Ontario from a private seller. In that case you don't pay the GST.

maxima_'90
01-17-2008, 08:35 PM
Actually you can't "just show up at the border". You need to fax the title for the car to the US customs office at the border point you're crossing at at LEAST 72 hours ahead of time.
When you export the car, you need to stop at that office on the US side - they will give you a form to show the car is being exported. You drive across the border and stop at the Canadian Customs office. They will charge you GST plus $100 air conditioning tax if applicable. You will pay the PST when you register the car in Ontario (you will need a safety and e-test). There is no duty or fees for any car over 15 years old.

Hope that helps.


The export is a U.S. requirement, not a Canadian one. We'll still import it withought the title stamped. And the export office doesn't accept faxes any more, you have to stop in and they photocopy the title.

Also, duty is still applicable because the car will not have been made in North America. You can check where it was made by the VIN, numbers 1 to 5 indicated North America, anything else means it wasn't. BMW's all start with a W which is for Germany, odly enough. Even though some bimmers have final assembly done in the States, most of the parts are made or partially assembled elsewhere so they don't get counted as North American vehicles.

The only advantage there is to importing a vehicle which is 15+ years old is that it is automatically admissible, and you don't have to pay the $206 RIV fee.

MGYVER
01-17-2008, 10:33 PM
"The export is a U.S. requirement, not a Canadian one. We'll still import it withought the title stamped. And the export office doesn't accept faxes any more, you have to stop in and they photocopy the title."

This is a fairly new requirement then (the not accepting faxes).

"Also, duty is still applicable because the car will not have been made in North America. You can check where it was made by the VIN, numbers 1 to 5 indicated North America, anything else means it wasn't. BMW's all start with a W which is for Germany, odly enough. Even though some bimmers have final assembly done in the States, most of the parts are made or partially assembled elsewhere so they don't get counted as North American vehicles."

All I can tell you is that for the Porsche I imported before and the last car, a 1991 M5 I imported 11 months ago, I was not charged duty on either car because both cars were >15 years old. I know duty applies to non-North American made cars (under NAFTA) but I still believe there is an exemption for cars over 15 years old. (unless the Customs guy thinks that Stuttgart (Porsche) and Garching (E34 M5) are places in the US).
I tried to find a reference in the CCRA website, but we all know how convoluted that site is to navigate.